Who Goes First? Who Goes First? is the title of a book I just read by Lawrence K. Altman, MD. It’s a “must-read” for anyone interested in the ethics and history of experimentation on human subjects. In it, Altman chronicles the history of self-experimentation, most of which pertains to the development of ... Editorial
Editorial  |   November 01, 2005
Who Goes First?
 
Author Notes
  • Editor
    Editor×
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   November 01, 2005
Who Goes First?
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2005, Vol. 14, 259. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/025)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2005, Vol. 14, 259. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/025)
Who Goes First? is the title of a book I just read by Lawrence K. Altman, MD. It’s a “must-read” for anyone interested in the ethics and history of experimentation on human subjects. In it, Altman chronicles the history of self-experimentation, most of which pertains to the development of new medical treatments. His thesis is that, without self-experimentation, we might not have painless surgery, vaccines for yellow fever and cholera, and countless other medical essentials. He relates what must be hundreds of fascinating stories about the heroes of self-experimentation and their significant and unique contributions to the improvement of human health.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access