Effect of Communication Disability on Satisfaction With Health Care A Survey of Medicare Beneficiaries Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2005
Effect of Communication Disability on Satisfaction With Health Care
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeanne M. Hoffman
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Kathryn M. Yorkston
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Anne Shumway-Cook
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Marcia A. Ciol
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Brian J. Dudgeon
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Leighton Chan
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Contact author: Jeanne M. Hoffman, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Box 356490, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-6490. E-mail: jeanneh@u.washington.edu
Article Information
Practice Management / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2005
Effect of Communication Disability on Satisfaction With Health Care
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2005, Vol. 14, 221-228. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/022)
History: Received January 27, 2005 , Accepted July 18, 2005
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2005, Vol. 14, 221-228. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/022)
History: Received January 27, 2005; Accepted July 18, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 35

Purpose: To examine the prevalence and characteristics of community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries reporting a communication disability and the relationship between that disability and dissatisfaction with medical care.

Method: A total of 12,769 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey respondents age 65 and older in 2001 were categorized by level of communication disability. Sampling weights were used to make inferences about the entire Medicare population.

Results: Over 16 million beneficiaries reported a communication disability. Hearing problems were most commonly reported (41.99%). The association between dissatisfaction and communication disability was statistically significant (p ≤ .05) for 8 of 10 items.

Conclusions: Prevalence of dissatisfaction among those with a communication disability varied, ranging from 3.43% to 19.34%. Respondents with a communication disability reported much more dissatisfaction when compared with those respondents without a communication disability.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Grant MM-0625-04/04) through an Extramural Project Grant with the Association of Academic Medical Centers. Additional resources were provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.
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