Evidence-Based Practice Among Speech-Language Pathologists Attitudes, Utilization, and Barriers Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2005
Evidence-Based Practice Among Speech-Language Pathologists
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard P. Zipoli, Jr.
    Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven
  • Marianne Kennedy
    Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven
  • Contact author: Richard P. Zipoli, Jr., 36 Nelson Drive, Burlington, CT 06013. E-mail: ecrpz@aol.com
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2005
Evidence-Based Practice Among Speech-Language Pathologists
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2005, Vol. 14, 208-220. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/021)
History: Received October 6, 2004 , Accepted July 5, 2005
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2005, Vol. 14, 208-220. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/021)
History: Received October 6, 2004; Accepted July 5, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 56

A total of 240 speech-language pathologists responded to a questionnaire examining attitudes toward and use of research and evidence-based practice (EBP). Perceived barriers to EBP were also explored. Positive attitudes toward research and EBP were reported. Attitudes were predicted by exposure to research and EBP practice during graduate training and the clinical fellowship year (CFY). Clinical experience and opinions of colleagues were used to guide decision making more frequently than research studies or clinical practice guidelines. Only exposure to research and EBP during the CFY predicted use of evidence-based resources. Respondents reported a decline in exposure to research and EBP as they moved from graduate training into the CFY. A lack of time was perceived as a barrier to EBP.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported by a Graduate Research Fellowship from the School of Graduate Studies at Southern Connecticut State University and by a research grant from the Graduate Student Affairs Committee. A paper summarizing this investigation was presented at the 2004 ASHA Convention through a Student Research Travel Award from ASHA's Science and Research Unit. The authors wish to express their appreciation to Sandra Holley, PhD, Dean of the School of Graduate Studies; Paul Cascella, PhD, Reader and Survey Reviewer; and Deborah Weiss, PhD, Survey Reviewer. We are also grateful to the speech-language pathologists who participated in this study and to our families.
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