From the Editor Writing is essential to the scientific process. This truth was pointed out by Day (1994), who wrote: “A scientific experiment … is not completed until the results are published” (p. ix). Interestingly, he went on to modify his original statement to say that an experiment is not complete until ... Editorial
Editorial  |   May 01, 2005
From the Editor
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   May 01, 2005
From the Editor
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2005, Vol. 14, 91. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/010)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2005, Vol. 14, 91. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/010)
Writing is essential to the scientific process. This truth was pointed out by Day (1994), who wrote: “A scientific experiment … is not completed until the results are published” (p. ix). Interestingly, he went on to modify his original statement to say that an experiment is not complete until the results have been “published and understood” (p. 2). So, perhaps my initial statement should read: Understandablewriting is essential to the scientific process.
My own writing is always evolving. Each time I go through a review process—whether it be as an author, reviewer, or editor—I learn ways to write more clearly, efficiently, or creatively. All of us, no matter how long we have been in this business, can probably improve our writing skills. For those of us who are newest to the writing business, an extra measure of guidance may be needed. Below, I offer some tips to the new author who is writing a research manuscript for the first time.
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