Concurrent Validity of the Language Development Survey: Associations With the MacArthur—Bates Communicative Development Inventories Words and Sentences Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2005
Concurrent Validity of the Language Development Survey: Associations With the MacArthur—Bates Communicative Development Inventories
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Leslie Rescorla
    Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA
  • Nan Bernstein Ratner
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • Peter Jusczyk
    Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore
  • Anne Marie Jusczyk
    Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore
  • Contact author: Leslie Rescorla, Department of Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, 101 N. Merion Avenue, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010. E-mail: lrescorl@brynmawr.edu
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2005
Concurrent Validity of the Language Development Survey: Associations With the MacArthur—Bates Communicative Development Inventories
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2005, Vol. 14, 156-163. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/016)
History: Received September 14, 2004 , Accepted April 4, 2005
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2005, Vol. 14, 156-163. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/016)
History: Received September 14, 2004; Accepted April 4, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 28

This study examined the concurrent validity of the Language Development Survey (LDS), a 310-word parent report screening tool for language delay in toddlers, by testing its associations with the MacArthur—Bates Communicative Development Inventories: Words and Sentences (CDI:WS), a 680-word parent report instrument. Participants were 239 toddlers 23–25 months of age. The correlation between total vocabulary score on the 2 instruments was .95, and correlations across comparable semantic categories ranged from .84 to .94. The correlation between the LDS and the CDI:WS for mean length of phrases calculated on 3 examples of the child’s longest and best phrases was .90. Both instruments demonstrated that parents reported higher vocabulary and mean phrase length scores for girls. The study indicates that information obtained from the LDS about rank ordering of toddlers in terms of their reported vocabulary and mean length of phrases is equivalent to that obtained from the longer CDI:WS.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the Bamford-Lahey Children’s Foundation, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grant 15795 to Peter W. Jusczyk, and Senior Scientist Award 01490 from the National Institute of Mental Health to Peter W. Jusczyk. We wish to thank and remember Peter W. Jusczyk, without whose pioneering work this project would not have been possible. We also wish to thank the many students and colleagues who contributed to the infant laboratory studies from which this sample was drawn. Finally, the authors wish to thank the children and parents who gave of their time to participate in this research.
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