Use of Narrative-Based Language Intervention With Children Who Have Specific Language Impairment Ten 7–8-year-old children with specific language impairment participated in a 6-week program of narrative-based language intervention (NBLI) in an effort to evaluate NBLI’s feasibility. Each intervention session targeted story content as well as story and sentence form using story retell and generation tasks. Eight children achieved the clinically significant improvement ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2005
Use of Narrative-Based Language Intervention With Children Who Have Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lori A. Swanson
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Carrie E. Mills
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Lynn S. Hood
    National Health Care, Murfreesboro, TN
  • Contact author: Lori A. Swanson, University of Tennessee, Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, 578 South Stadium Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996-0740. E-mail: lswanson@utk.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2005
Use of Narrative-Based Language Intervention With Children Who Have Specific Language Impairment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2005, Vol. 14, 131-141. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/014)
History: Received December 18, 2003 , Accepted February 25, 2005
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2005, Vol. 14, 131-141. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/014)
History: Received December 18, 2003; Accepted February 25, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 42

Ten 7–8-year-old children with specific language impairment participated in a 6-week program of narrative-based language intervention (NBLI) in an effort to evaluate NBLI’s feasibility. Each intervention session targeted story content as well as story and sentence form using story retell and generation tasks. Eight children achieved the clinically significant improvement criterion from pre- and posttest comparisons of at least 1.45 points on a narrative quality (NQ) rating (p < .013). Throughout the NBLI program, the children were informally observed to show increased self-confidence in their narrative production skills. Nearly all children preferred story generation activities over story retell tasks, while story retell tasks were favored over sentence imitation drills. Pre- and posttest comparisons for number of different words, developmental sentence score, and a sentence imitation task were nonsignificant. This indicated no further evidence of positive outcomes for NBLI. Based on the significant findings for NQ, NBLI is worthy of further investigation. Modifications to enhance its ability to produce positive gains are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This project was funded by the Bamford-Lahey Children’s Foundation. The authors thank Jim Montgomery, Teresa Ukrainetz, and an anonymous reviewer for their insightful comments. We thank Abigail Pfeiler and Stacey Walter for their assistance in creating the novel stories and conducting data analyses. We are grateful to Barbara Culatta for her many valuable contributions and Tim Meline for his statistical expertise. We also thank the following students who assisted in countless ways: Rebecca Ensminger, Jennifer Jones, Ashley Little, Cara Prall, Sarah Rice, Mary Katherine Shay, and Erin Tully. Finally, appreciation is extended to the children and their parents who made this study possible.
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