Tutorial  |   May 2005
Working Memory in Aphasia
 
Author Notes
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: hhwrig2@uky.edu
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   May 2005
Working Memory in Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2005, Vol. 14, 107-118. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/012)
History: Received May 25, 2004 , Revised November 3, 2004 , Accepted February 25, 2005
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2005, Vol. 14, 107-118. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/012)
History: Received May 25, 2004; Revised November 3, 2004; Accepted February 25, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

Recently, researchers have suggested that deficits in working memory capacity contribute to language-processing difficulties observed in individuals with aphasia (e.g., I. Caspari, S. Parkinson, L. LaPointe, & R. Katz, 1998; R. A. Downey et al., 2004; N. Friedmann & A. Gvion, 2003; H. H. Wright, M. Newhoff, R. Downey, & S. Austermann, 2003). A theoretical framework of working memory can aid in our understanding of a disrupted system (e.g., after stroke) and how this relates to language comprehension and production. Additionally, understanding the theoretical basis of working memory is important for the measurement and treatment of working memory. The literature indicates that future investigations of measurement and treatment of working memory are warranted in order to determine the role of working memory in language processing.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access