Reduplication Revisited Functions, Constraints, Repairs, and Clinical Implications Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2005
Reduplication Revisited
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harriet B. Klein
    New York University
  • Contact author: Harriet B. Klein, Department of Speech-Language-Pathology and Audiology, New York University, 719 Broadway, Suite 202, New York, NY, 10003. E-mail: hbk1@nyu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2005
Reduplication Revisited
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2005, Vol. 14, 71-83. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/009)
History: Received February 4, 2004 , Revised July 7, 2004 , Accepted January 28, 2005
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2005, Vol. 14, 71-83. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/009)
History: Received February 4, 2004; Revised July 7, 2004; Accepted January 28, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

This case study considers the phonological forms of early lexical items produced by 1 normally developing boy, from 19 to 22 months of age, who began to produce all monosyllabic words as bisyllabic. In order to link this empirical data (the apparent creation of increased complexity) with universal tendencies (motivated by the reduction of complexity), the functions of reduplication were revisited. Phonological processes (i.e., reduplication and final consonant deletion) are viewed as repairs motivated by 2 interacting constraints (i.e., constraints on monosyllabic words and on word-final consonants). These longitudinal case study data provide further evidence for a relationship between final consonant deletion and reduplication. A possible treatment approach for similar patterns demonstrated clinically is recommended.

Acknowledgments
I would like to thank Johanna Smialek for her assistance with listening to the tape-recorded productions. I am also grateful to colleagues who read drafts of the manuscript: Elaine Altman, David Ingram, Laura Koenig, and Nelson Moses. Aspects of this work were presented at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in November 1999, and at the annual convention of the New York State Speech-Language-Hearing Association in April 2000.
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