Story Presentation Effects on Children’s Retell Content This study investigated the possibility that the amount of content children include in their stories is affected by how stories are presented. Simple stories were presented to kindergarten and Grade 2 children in 3 conditions: orally (oral only), pictorially (pictures only), and combined oral and pictures. The kindergarteners recalled more ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2005
Story Presentation Effects on Children’s Retell Content
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Phyllis Schneider
    University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  • Rita Vis Dubé
    Toronto District School Board, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Phyllis Schneider, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Alberta, 2-70 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G4, Canada. E-mail: phyllis.schneider@ualberta.ca
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2005
Story Presentation Effects on Children’s Retell Content
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2005, Vol. 14, 52-60. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/007)
History: Received December 23, 2002 , Revised February 9, 2004 , Accepted December 15, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2005, Vol. 14, 52-60. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/007)
History: Received December 23, 2002; Revised February 9, 2004; Accepted December 15, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 24

This study investigated the possibility that the amount of content children include in their stories is affected by how stories are presented. Simple stories were presented to kindergarten and Grade 2 children in 3 conditions: orally (oral only), pictorially (pictures only), and combined oral and pictures. The kindergarteners recalled more content in the combined condition than in pictures only. The 2nd graders recalled more content in the oral only and combined conditions than in pictures only. The grades differed in both conditions involving oral presentation, but not in the pictures only condition. Thus, children in both grades provided more story information when they retold a story presented orally than when they told the story from pictures alone.

Acknowledgments
Funding for this study was provided by the Central Research Fund, University of Alberta. The authors would like to thank Connie Lam, Cathy Gayowsky, and Roxanne Friesenhan Robertson for their assistance with the data.
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