Utility of the MacArthur—Bates Communicative Development Inventory in Identifying Language Abilities of Late-Talking and Typically Developing Toddlers The present study investigated the validity of the MacArthur—Bates Communicative Development Inventory (CDI) for a group of toddlers 30 months of age. Study 1 examined the concurrent validity of the CDI for a group of 38 late talkers. Significant correlations were found between the CDI and direct measures of language ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2005
Utility of the MacArthur—Bates Communicative Development Inventory in Identifying Language Abilities of Late-Talking and Typically Developing Toddlers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John Heilmann
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Susan Ellis Weismer
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Julia Evans
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Christine Hollar
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to John Heilmann, 1975 Willow Drive, Madison, WI 53706. E-mail: jjheilmann@wisc.edu
Article Information
Development / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2005
Utility of the MacArthur—Bates Communicative Development Inventory in Identifying Language Abilities of Late-Talking and Typically Developing Toddlers
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2005, Vol. 14, 40-51. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/006)
History: Received October 30, 2003 , Revised June 7, 2004 , Accepted December 13, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2005, Vol. 14, 40-51. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/006)
History: Received October 30, 2003; Revised June 7, 2004; Accepted December 13, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 71

The present study investigated the validity of the MacArthur—Bates Communicative Development Inventory (CDI) for a group of toddlers 30 months of age. Study 1 examined the concurrent validity of the CDI for a group of 38 late talkers. Significant correlations were found between the CDI and direct measures of language abilities. Study 2 used likelihood ratio analysis to determine how well the CDI sorted 100 toddlers (38 late talkers and 62 children with a history of normal language development) according to language status based on direct assessment measures. The analyses showed that the CDI was effective in identifying children with low language skills up to the 11th percentile and in identifying children with normal language skills above the 49th percentile.

Acknowledgments
Funding for this research was provided by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Grant 5 R01 DC03731, “Linguistic Processing in Specific Language Delay,” and by Core Grant P30 HD03352 to the Waisman Center from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Support for John Heilmann’s participation in the project was provided by NIDCD Grant 5 T32 DC005459, “Interdisciplinary Research Training in Speech-Language Disorders.” We would like to extend thanks to all the children and families who made this research possible.
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