Does Barium Influence Tongue Behaviors During Swallowing? The validity of videofluoroscopic swallowing assessments rests on the understanding that thin, nectar-, honey-, and spoon-thick radiopaque liquids resemble nonopaque liquids, both in their consistency and in the variations in swallowing that they elicit. Tongue movements during sequential swallows of opaque and nonopaque liquids were studied in 8 healthy participants ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2005
Does Barium Influence Tongue Behaviors During Swallowing?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Catriona M. Steele
    University of Toronto and Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Pascal H. H. M. van Lieshout
    University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Catriona M. Steele, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, 550 University Avenue, #801, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2A2, Canada. E-mail:steele.catriona@torontorehab.on.ca
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2005
Does Barium Influence Tongue Behaviors During Swallowing?
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2005, Vol. 14, 27-39. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/005)
History: Received October 24, 2003 , Revised March 8, 2004 , Accepted December 5, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2005, Vol. 14, 27-39. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2005/005)
History: Received October 24, 2003; Revised March 8, 2004; Accepted December 5, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 16

The validity of videofluoroscopic swallowing assessments rests on the understanding that thin, nectar-, honey-, and spoon-thick radiopaque liquids resemble nonopaque liquids, both in their consistency and in the variations in swallowing that they elicit. Tongue movements during sequential swallows of opaque and nonopaque liquids were studied in 8 healthy participants in 2 age groups (<30 years, >50 years) using electromagnetic midsagittal articulography. Differences included smaller sip size, longer oropharyngeal transit times, and greater variability in tongue movement patterns with opaque liquids compared to nonopaque liquids, but effect sizes for these differences were small. Transit times were significantly longer for older participants than younger participants. We recommend matching radiopaque bolus size in videofluoroscopy to the patient’s habitually preferred sip mass for comparator nonopaque liquids.

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