The Single Exposure Partial Word Knowledge Growth Through Reading Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2004
The Single Exposure
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stacy A. Wagovich
    University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Marilyn Newhoff
    San Diego State University, San Diego, CA
  • Contact author: Stacy A. Wagovich, Department of Communication Science and Disorders, 303 Lewis Hall, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211. E-mail: wagovichs@health.missouri.edu
Article Information
Development / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2004
The Single Exposure
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2004, Vol. 13, 316-328. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/032)
History: Received March 22, 2004 , Accepted September 2, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2004, Vol. 13, 316-328. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/032)
History: Received March 22, 2004; Accepted September 2, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

A critical aspect of the assessment of children's word learning processes is the examination of word knowledge growth over time. The purpose of this study was to examine the types of partial word knowledge (PWK) growth that occurred from 1 exposure to unfamiliar words in text, taking into account the roles of part of speech and individual language skills. Sixth-grade children with normal language read stories containing unfamiliar nouns and verbs. The children then completed 2 tasks to assess PWK. Results were that at least 1 type of PWK developed: knowledge that a word exists as a lexical entry in the language. Part of speech appeared to play a role; significant PWK at posttest was apparent for verbs but not for nouns. Children's language skills did not appear to impact the amount of PWK demonstrated at posttest.

Acknowledgments
This research was conducted while the authors were at The University of Georgia, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. The authors gratefully acknowledge The University of Georgia faculty members Anne van Kleeck, Anne Bothe, Adalaida Restrepo, Bruce Britton, and Paula Schwanenflugel for their guidance throughout the project. Thanks also to students Angela Norris, Mary Paige Long, and Jocelyn Archer at The University of Georgia, and Miranda Beckmann at The University of Missouri, for their assistance at various points throughout the project. In addition, we extend our sincere thanks to Philip Dale and Marc Fey, who provided valuable feedback on earlier versions of this article.
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