Narrative Skills in Children With Selective Mutism An Exploratory Study Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2004
Narrative Skills in Children With Selective Mutism
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alison McInnes
    The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Daniel Fung
    The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Katharina Manassis
    The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Lisa Fiksenbaum
    The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Rosemary Tannock, PhD
    The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Rosemary Tannock, PhD, Brain and Behavior Research Program, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario MG5 1X8, Canada. E-mail: rosemary.tannock@sickkids.on.ca
  • Daniel Fung is now at the Institute of Mental Health, Singapore.
    Daniel Fung is now at the Institute of Mental Health, Singapore.×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2004
Narrative Skills in Children With Selective Mutism
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2004, Vol. 13, 304-315. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/031)
History: Received July 10, 2003 , Revised January 15, 2004 , Accepted July 28, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2004, Vol. 13, 304-315. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/031)
History: Received July 10, 2003; Revised January 15, 2004; Accepted July 28, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 16

Selective mutism (SM) is a rare and complex disorder associated with anxiety symptoms and speech-language deficits; however, the nature of these language deficits has not been studied systematically. A novel cross-disciplinary assessment protocol was used to assess anxiety and nonverbal cognitive, receptive language, and expressive narrative abilities in 7 children with SM and a comparison group of 7 children with social phobia (SP). The children with SM produced significantly shorter narratives than children with SP, despite showing normal nonverbal cognitive and receptive language abilities. The findings suggest that SM may involve subtle expressive language deficits that may influence academic performance and raise additional questions for further research. The assessment procedure developed for this study may be potentially useful for language clinicians.

Acknowledgment
This study was funded by the Psychiatry Endowment Fund, Hospital for Sick Children.
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