Relations Among Maternal, Child, and Demographic Factors and the Persistence of Preschool Language Impairment This research used the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care database of 1,364 children to identify children at 3 years of age who could generally be characterized as exhibiting specific language impairment. Seventy-three identified children were classified into 2 groups on the basis ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   November 01, 2004
Relations Among Maternal, Child, and Demographic Factors and the Persistence of Preschool Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen M. LaParo, PhD
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Laura Justice
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Lori E. Skibbe
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Robert C. Pianta
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Contact author: Karen M. LaParo, PhD, now at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 228 Stone Building, Greensboro, North Carolina 27402. E-mail: kmlaparo@uncg.edu
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2004
Relations Among Maternal, Child, and Demographic Factors and the Persistence of Preschool Language Impairment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2004, Vol. 13, 291-303. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/030)
History: Received May 5, 2003 , Revised December 4, 2003 , Accepted July 13, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2004, Vol. 13, 291-303. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/030)
History: Received May 5, 2003; Revised December 4, 2003; Accepted July 13, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 35

This research used the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care database of 1,364 children to identify children at 3 years of age who could generally be characterized as exhibiting specific language impairment. Seventy-three identified children were classified into 2 groups on the basis of standardized assessment of language skills at 4.5 years: children whose language impairment had resolved (n = 33) versus those whose language impairment persisted (n = 40). A logistic regression model using measures of maternal sensitivity, maternal depression, child externalizing behaviors, child health history, family income-to-needs ratio, and quality of home environment was used to predict group membership. Maternal sensitivity and maternal depression contributed significantly to the prediction model for group membership. Results are discussed in terms of theoretical and clinical implications.

Acknowledgments
The development of the database used in this article was supported in part under the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The Study of Early Child Care is directed by a steering committee and supported by NICHD through a cooperative agreement (U10) that calls for the scientific collaboration between grantees and the NICHD staff. The contents do not necessarily represent the positions or policies of NICHD, and endorsement by the federal government should not be assumed. We express our sincere gratitude to Ryan Bowles for his theoretical and statistical guidance in this work.
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