Effect of Phonemic Perception Training on the Speech Production and Phonological Awareness Skills of Children With Expressive Phonological Delay Children with expressive phonological delays often possess poor underlying perceptual knowledge of the sound system and show delayed development of segmental organization of that system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the benefits of a perceptual approach to the treatment of expressive phonological delay. Thirty-four preschoolers with moderate ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2004
Effect of Phonemic Perception Training on the Speech Production and Phonological Awareness Skills of Children With Expressive Phonological Delay
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Rvachew, PhD
    McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada
  • Michele Nowak
    Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Genevieve Cloutier
    McGill University
  • Contact author: Susan Rvachew, PhD, Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University, 1266 Pine Avenue West, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3G 1A8. E-mail: susan.rvachew@mcgill.ca.
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2004
Effect of Phonemic Perception Training on the Speech Production and Phonological Awareness Skills of Children With Expressive Phonological Delay
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2004, Vol. 13, 250-263. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/026)
History: Received August 18, 2003 , Revised January 7, 2004 , Accepted June 28, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2004, Vol. 13, 250-263. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/026)
History: Received August 18, 2003; Revised January 7, 2004; Accepted June 28, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 43

Children with expressive phonological delays often possess poor underlying perceptual knowledge of the sound system and show delayed development of segmental organization of that system. The purpose of this study was to investigate the benefits of a perceptual approach to the treatment of expressive phonological delay. Thirty-four preschoolers with moderate or severe expressive phonological delays received 16 treatment sessions in addition to their regular speech-language therapy. The experimental group received training in phonemic perception, letter recognition, letter-sound association, and onset-rime matching. The control group listened to computerized books. The experimental group showed greater improvements in phonemic perception and articulatory accuracy but not in phonological awareness in comparison with the control group.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported by the Canadian Language and Literacy Research Network (CLLRNet) and the Alberta Children's Hospital Foundation. We are grateful to Jill Newman for conducting all of the pre- and posttreatment assessments, to the speech-language pathologists and patients at the Alberta Children's Hospital for participating in this study, and to Alyssa Ohberg for her assistance with manuscript preparation.
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