Self-Rating of Stuttering Severity as a Clinical Tool Scaling is a convenient and equipment-free means for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and clients to evaluate stuttering severity in everyday situations. This study investigated the extent to which the severity ratings of 10 adult stuttering speakers, made immediately after speaking and again from recordings 6 months later, agreed with ratings made ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 2004
Self-Rating of Stuttering Severity as a Clinical Tool
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sue O'Brian, PhD
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Ann Packman
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Mark Onslow
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Contact author: Sue O'Brian, PhD, Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, New South Wales 1825, Australia. E-mail: S.Obrian@fhs.usyd.edu.au
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 2004
Self-Rating of Stuttering Severity as a Clinical Tool
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2004, Vol. 13, 219-226. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/023)
History: Received April 23, 2003 , Revised September 23, 2003 , Accepted May 28, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2004, Vol. 13, 219-226. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/023)
History: Received April 23, 2003; Revised September 23, 2003; Accepted May 28, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 32

Scaling is a convenient and equipment-free means for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and clients to evaluate stuttering severity in everyday situations. This study investigated the extent to which the severity ratings of 10 adult stuttering speakers, made immediately after speaking and again from recordings 6 months later, agreed with ratings made by an SLP. For 9 of the 10 speakers, there was good agreement between their initial ratings and those of the SLP. For 8 of the 10 speakers, there was also good agreement between their initial ratings and those made from recordings 6 months later, indicating that the severity ratings made at the time of speaking were reliable. These findings support the use of the 9-point scale as a clinical measurement procedure.

Acknowledgments
We thank Margaret Webber and Angela Cream for their assistance with this experiment.
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