Effect-Size Reporting Practices in AJSLP and Other ASHA Journals, 1999–2003 A census of effect-size practices in the past 5 volumes of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association journals was accomplished. Inclusion of effect size in quantitative research reports increased from 5 reports with effect size in 1990 to 1994 to 120 reports in 1999 to 2003. Nonetheless, effect size was reported less than ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   August 01, 2004
Effect-Size Reporting Practices in AJSLP and Other ASHA Journals, 1999–2003
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Timothy Meline, PhD
    The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg
  • Bailey Wang
    The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg
  • Contact author: Timothy Meline, PhD, The University of Texas—Pan American, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 1201 West University Drive, Edinburg, TX 78541-2999. E-mail: TM2776@AOL.COM
Article Information
ASHA News & Member Stories / Language Disorders / Viewpoints
Viewpoint   |   August 01, 2004
Effect-Size Reporting Practices in AJSLP and Other ASHA Journals, 1999–2003
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2004, Vol. 13, 202-207. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/021)
History: Received May 23, 2002 , Accepted June 4, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2004, Vol. 13, 202-207. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/021)
History: Received May 23, 2002; Accepted June 4, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

A census of effect-size practices in the past 5 volumes of American Speech-Language-Hearing Association journals was accomplished. Inclusion of effect size in quantitative research reports increased from 5 reports with effect size in 1990 to 1994 to 120 reports in 1999 to 2003. Nonetheless, effect size was reported less than 30% of the time when inferential statistics were used, and only half of those reports included an interpretation of effect size. This article presents case exemplars to illustrate the use and value of effect size and includes suggestions for interpreting effect size. Researchers are encouraged to routinely report effect size and to interpret effect size in a way that facilitates the application of research to practice.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access