Listener Attitudes Toward Individuals With Cerebral Palsy Who Use Speech Supplementation Strategies This study examined listener attitudes toward 7 speakers with dysarthria who implemented 3 speech supplementation strategies (topic cues, alphabet cues, and combined topic and alphabet cues) and a habitual speech control condition. Findings were similar, but not identical, to intelligibility results published in 2 earlier papers (K. C. Hustad, J. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2004
Listener Attitudes Toward Individuals With Cerebral Palsy Who Use Speech Supplementation Strategies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katherine C. Hustad, PhD
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Kathryn J. Gearhart
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Contact author: Katherine C. Hustad, PhD, 475 Waisman Center, 1500 Highland Avenue, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI 53705. E-mail: hustad@waisman.wisc.edu
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2004
Listener Attitudes Toward Individuals With Cerebral Palsy Who Use Speech Supplementation Strategies
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2004, Vol. 13, 168-181. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/017)
History: Received August 4, 2003 , Accepted January 30, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2004, Vol. 13, 168-181. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/017)
History: Received August 4, 2003; Accepted January 30, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

This study examined listener attitudes toward 7 speakers with dysarthria who implemented 3 speech supplementation strategies (topic cues, alphabet cues, and combined topic and alphabet cues) and a habitual speech control condition. Findings were similar, but not identical, to intelligibility results published in 2 earlier papers (K. C. Hustad, J. Auker, N. Natale, & R. Carlson, 2003; K. C. Hustad, T. Jones, & S. Dailey, 2003). For each speaker, alphabet cues and combined cues resulted in higher attitude ratings than habitual speech, and combined cues resulted in higher ratings than topic cues. Listener ratings pertaining to cognitive, affective, and behavioral components of attitude showed that ratings for the behavioral component were the highest for all but 1 speaker. The relationship between intelligibility scores and attitude ratings for each speaker were strong and positive, indicating that attitude ratings seem to increase linearly with intelligibility scores.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this article were presented at the 10th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Odense, Denmark, August 2002. The authors extend a special thanks to the speakers with dysarthria who participated in this research.
This research was supported, in part, by a New Investigator grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, awarded to the first author.
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