The Impact of Aided Language Stimulation on Symbol Comprehension and Production in Children With Moderate Cognitive Disabilities Over the past decade, aided language stimulation has emerged as a strategy to promote both symbol comprehension and symbol production among individuals who use graphic mode communication systems. During aided language stimulation, an interventionist points to a graphic symbol while simultaneously producing the corresponding spoken word during natural communicative exchanges. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2004
The Impact of Aided Language Stimulation on Symbol Comprehension and Production in Children With Moderate Cognitive Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael D. Harris, PhD
    University of Wisconsin-River Falls
  • Joe Reichle
    University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
  • Contact author: Michael D. Harris, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin–River Falls, 410 South Third Street, River Falls, WI 54022. E-mail: michael.d.harris@uwrf.edu
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2004
The Impact of Aided Language Stimulation on Symbol Comprehension and Production in Children With Moderate Cognitive Disabilities
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2004, Vol. 13, 155-167. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/016)
History: Received January 8, 2003 , Accepted January 21, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2004, Vol. 13, 155-167. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/016)
History: Received January 8, 2003; Accepted January 21, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 33

Over the past decade, aided language stimulation has emerged as a strategy to promote both symbol comprehension and symbol production among individuals who use graphic mode communication systems. During aided language stimulation, an interventionist points to a graphic symbol while simultaneously producing the corresponding spoken word during natural communicative exchanges. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of aided language stimulation on children with moderate cognitive disabilities. Three preschool children with moderate cognitive disabilities who were functionally nonspeaking participated in the investigation. The investigator implemented a multiple-probe design across symbol sets/activities. Elicited probes were used to determine whether the children increased their comprehension and production of graphic symbols. Results indicated that all 3 children displayed increased symbol comprehension and production following the implementation of aided language stimulation.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank Susan Hupp, Jennifer McComas, and Jennifer Windsor, all of whom served as members of the first author's dissertation committee. The authors would also like to thank the school administrators and staff, parents, and children who made this study possible.
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