Self-Monitoring Recall During Two Tasks After Traumatic Brain Injury A Preliminary Study Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2004
Self-Monitoring Recall During Two Tasks After Traumatic Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary R. T. Kennedy, PhD
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Mary R. T. Kennedy, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Dr. S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455. E-mail: kenne047@umn.edu
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2004
Self-Monitoring Recall During Two Tasks After Traumatic Brain Injury
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2004, Vol. 13, 142-154. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/015)
History: Received June 18, 2003 , Accepted December 15, 2003
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2004, Vol. 13, 142-154. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/015)
History: Received June 18, 2003; Accepted December 15, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

Impaired recall is a common consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Predicting recall during learning is a critical part of self-monitoring. Adults with TBI and noninjured controls made recall predictions of noun pairs that varied in prediction timing (immediate, delayed), and predictions of narrative information that varied in salience (main idea and details) and explicitness (stated and implied). For both groups, delayed recall predictions for noun pairs and stated (narrative) information were relatively accurate, whereas immediate recall predictions of noun pairs and delayed predictions of implied information were relatively inaccurate. Both groups were more confident making predictions of stated information than implied information. Neither predictive accuracy nor confidence generalized across tasks. Working memory load across tasks and individual differences are proposed explanations. The lack of generalization highlights the need to train domain or task-specific self-monitoring.

Acknowledgment
The University of Minnesota (Grant-in-Aid of Research, Artistry and Scholarship) funded portions of this study. The author extends thanks to the community professionals who referred participants and to all those individuals who gave of their time and effort in participating. Special thanks are extended to Michael Nawrocki, Edward Carney, and Suzanne Peters for their contribution to the larger studies from which these data were compiled. A portion of this study was presented at the Clinical Aphasiology Conference, May 2002, Big Cedar Lodge, MO.
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