Speaking for Another The Management of Participant Frames in Aphasia Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 01, 2004
Speaking for Another
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nina Simmons-Mackie, PhD
    Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond
  • Debbie Kingston
    Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond
  • Misty Schultz
    Key Rehabilitation Associates, Natchez, MS
  • Contact author: Nina Simmons-Mackie, PhD, 59020 Highway 433, Slidell, LA 70460. E-mail: nmackie@selu.edu
Article Information
Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 01, 2004
Speaking for Another
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2004, Vol. 13, 114-127. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/013)
History: Received September 11, 2003 , Accepted March 23, 2004
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2004, Vol. 13, 114-127. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2004/013)
History: Received September 11, 2003; Accepted March 23, 2004
Web of Science® Times Cited: 22

A sociolinguistic analysis of an interaction between a woman with aphasia and a nonaphasic speaking partner was conducted to investigate participant framing in aphasia. Participant frames, or the stances that people take in conversation, help conversational participants structure their talk and collaboratively negotiate meaning (I. Goffman, 1974). This analysis revealed a configuration in which a person with severe aphasia enlisted her speaking partner to speak for her. That is, the interaction was framed such that the nonaphasic speaking partner served as the "spokesperson" for messages that were authored by the person with aphasia. The clinical requirements of adopting a "speaking for another" framework are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank Drs. Dana Kovarsky, Jacqueline Guendouzi, and Charles Goodwin for their comments and suggestions on various versions of the analyses or of this manuscript.
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