The Relationship of Self-Efficacy and Depression to Stuttering This study investigated the relationship of self-efficacy for verbal fluency, academic self-efficacy, and depression between adolescents who stutter and fluent speakers. Two separate discriminant function analyses were performed. The first analysis used the self-efficacy and depression scores as response variables and fluency classification as the grouping variable. Results indicated that ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2003
The Relationship of Self-Efficacy and Depression to Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melissa A. Bray, PhD
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Thomas J. Kehle
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Kimberly A. Lawless
    University of Illinois at Chicago Circle
  • Lea A. Theodore
    Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
  • Contact author: Melissa A. Bray, PhD, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Connecticut, U-2064, Storrs, CT 06269-2064.
    Contact author: Melissa A. Bray, PhD, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Connecticut, U-2064, Storrs, CT 06269-2064.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: mbray@uconn.edu
  • J. Scott Yaruss acted as guest Associate Editor for this article.
    J. Scott Yaruss acted as guest Associate Editor for this article.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2003
The Relationship of Self-Efficacy and Depression to Stuttering
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2003, Vol. 12, 425-431. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/088)
History: Received October 27, 2002 , Accepted March 28, 2003
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2003, Vol. 12, 425-431. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/088)
History: Received October 27, 2002; Accepted March 28, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

This study investigated the relationship of self-efficacy for verbal fluency, academic self-efficacy, and depression between adolescents who stutter and fluent speakers. Two separate discriminant function analyses were performed. The first analysis used the self-efficacy and depression scores as response variables and fluency classification as the grouping variable. Results indicated that self-efficacy for speech was the sole significant variable and accounted for 61% of the variance in group status. A second simplified discriminant function analysis was performed using speech self-efficacy as the sole predictor of group membership. This single discriminant function correctly classified 81% of the overall sample into their known groups. Further, classification for participants who did not stutter (95.2%) was better than for those who did stutter (67%). Based on this and earlier research, adolescents appear to be capable of using self-efficacy scaling as a measure of confidence for verbal fluency, which may eventually prove to be useful in treatment.

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