Effects of Voicing and Syntactic Complexity on Sign Expression in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Clients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) tend to exhibit inter- and intraclient variability of signs and symptoms. This variability may result in inaccurate assessment of severity. Accurate assessment of severity requires knowledge concerning the factors that affect the expression of ADSD signs and symptoms. This study examined ADSD sign expression ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2003
Effects of Voicing and Syntactic Complexity on Sign Expression in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Molly L. Erickson
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Contact author: Molly L. Erickson, Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Tennessee, 578 South Stadium Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996.
    Contact author: Molly L. Erickson, Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Tennessee, 578 South Stadium Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: merickso@utk.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2003
Effects of Voicing and Syntactic Complexity on Sign Expression in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2003, Vol. 12, 416-424. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/087)
History: Received August 26, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2003, Vol. 12, 416-424. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/087)
History: Received August 26, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

Clients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) tend to exhibit inter- and intraclient variability of signs and symptoms. This variability may result in inaccurate assessment of severity. Accurate assessment of severity requires knowledge concerning the factors that affect the expression of ADSD signs and symptoms. This study examined ADSD sign expression as a function of voicing and syntactic complexity. Fifteen ADSD participants and 15 control participants completed a task consisting of 30 sentences. ADSD signs were significantly more frequent in predominantly voiced sentences than in predominantly voiceless sentences, regardless of level of syntactic complexity. Center-embedded sentences comprising predominantly voiced consonants were found to evoke the greatest number of ADSD signs. These results have important implications for the assessment of ADSD.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a Professional Development Award from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. I must extend my deepest appreciation to the faculty and staff at the Vanderbilt Voice Center for allowing the collection of these data during very busy clinic hours. Particular thanks must be extended to Ed Stone, Cheryl Ballante, Melissa Kirby, Mark Courey, Gaelyn Garret, and James Neterville, all of whom provided great assistance and demonstrated infinite patience during the data collection process.
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