Diagnostic Criteria of Developmental Apraxia of Speech Used by Clinical Speech-Language Pathologists The diagnostic criteria used to identify developmental apraxia of speech (DAS) have been at the center of controversy for decades. Despite the difficulty in determining the characteristics that differentiate DAS from other speech acquisition disorders, many children are identified with this disorder. The current report presents the criteria used by ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2003
Diagnostic Criteria of Developmental Apraxia of Speech Used by Clinical Speech-Language Pathologists
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen Forrest, PhD
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Contact author: Karen Forrest, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, 200 South Jordan Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47401.
    Contact author: Karen Forrest, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, 200 South Jordan Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47401.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: kforrest@indiana.edu
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2003
Diagnostic Criteria of Developmental Apraxia of Speech Used by Clinical Speech-Language Pathologists
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2003, Vol. 12, 376-380. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/083)
History: Received December 10, 2001 , Accepted February 19, 2003
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2003, Vol. 12, 376-380. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/083)
History: Received December 10, 2001; Accepted February 19, 2003

The diagnostic criteria used to identify developmental apraxia of speech (DAS) have been at the center of controversy for decades. Despite the difficulty in determining the characteristics that differentiate DAS from other speech acquisition disorders, many children are identified with this disorder. The current report presents the criteria used by 75 speechlanguage pathologists to establish a diagnosis of DAS. Although 50 different characteristics were identified, 6 of these characteristics accounted for 51.5% of the responses. These characteristics included inconsistent productions, general oral-motor difficulties, groping, inability to imitate sounds, increasing difficulty with increased utterance length, and poor sequencing of sounds. These results are consistent with the general ambiguity of the diagnostic criteria of DAS and suggest that no single deficit is used among clinicians.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Communication Disorders Grant DC04575.
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