Single-Word and Conversational Measures of Word-Finding Proficiency Two studies with young adults as participants evaluated the relationship, presumed in the word-finding literature to exist, between slow, inaccurate performances in single-wordnaming and semantic-retrieval tasks and disruptions to conversational fluency. The measures evaluated were the frequency of conversational disruptions and the scores from 3 single-word tasks: total time from ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2003
Single-Word and Conversational Measures of Word-Finding Proficiency
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan J. Tingley
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Christiane S. Kyte
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Carla J. Johnson, PhD
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Joseph H. Beitchman
    Child and Family Studies Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Clarke Division, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Carla J. Johnson, PhD, Graduate Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Rehabilitation Sciences Building, 500 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1V7, Canada.
    Contact author: Carla J. Johnson, PhD, Graduate Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Rehabilitation Sciences Building, 500 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1V7, Canada.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: carla.johnson@utoronto.ca
  • * Currently affiliated with University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Currently affiliated with University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2003
Single-Word and Conversational Measures of Word-Finding Proficiency
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2003, Vol. 12, 359-368. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/081)
History: Received November 28, 2001 , Accepted February 14, 2003
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2003, Vol. 12, 359-368. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/081)
History: Received November 28, 2001; Accepted February 14, 2003

Two studies with young adults as participants evaluated the relationship, presumed in the word-finding literature to exist, between slow, inaccurate performances in single-wordnaming and semantic-retrieval tasks and disruptions to conversational fluency. The measures evaluated were the frequency of conversational disruptions and the scores from 3 single-word tasks: total time from the Rapid Automatized Naming task (RAN; M. B. Denckla & R. G. Rudel, 1976), standard score from the Brief Test of the Test of Adolescent/Adult Word Finding (TAWF; D. J. German, 1990), and total unique words from the Controlled Oral Word Association task (FAS; A. L. Benton & K. Hamsher, 1978). RAN time was the only significant predictor of the frequency of conversational disruptions, although this relationship was weak (R2 = .11). In addition, single-word performances did not discriminate between groups of participants with differing levels of conversational fluency. Clinicians are cautioned against identifying word-finding deficits using singleword measures alone. Moreover, the theoretical construct of word-finding difficulties requires additional validation.

Acknowledgments
This article is based on a Master’s research project completed by the first author under the supervision of the third author. Portions of this work were presented at the 1998 Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in San Antonio, TX, and the 2000 meeting of the Tri-Joint Congress in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. This research was supported by Grant 6606-5639-102 to Joseph H. Beitchman and colleagues from the National Health Research Development Program, Health and Welfare Canada, and by a grant to Carla J. Johnson from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.
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