Discriminative Validity of Selected Measures for Differentiating Normal From Aphasic Performance Normal elderly and mildly aphasic individuals may exhibit similar impairments in comprehension and expression. The discriminative validity between normal and aphasic performance on most standardized measures of aphasia has not been reported. The authors compared the performance of 18 aphasic and 18 normal adults to determine the discriminative validity of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2003
Discriminative Validity of Selected Measures for Differentiating Normal From Aphasic Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katherine B. Ross, PhD
    Carl T. Hayden VA Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ
  • Robert T. Wertz
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, and VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville
  • Contact author: Katherine B. Ross, PhD, Carl T. Hayden Medical Center, 650 E. Indian School Road, CS/126, Phoenix, AZ 85012.
    Contact author: Katherine B. Ross, PhD, Carl T. Hayden Medical Center, 650 E. Indian School Road, CS/126, Phoenix, AZ 85012.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: katherine.ross3@med.va.gov
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2003
Discriminative Validity of Selected Measures for Differentiating Normal From Aphasic Performance
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2003, Vol. 12, 312-319. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/077)
History: Received January 23, 2002 , Accepted December 17, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2003, Vol. 12, 312-319. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/077)
History: Received January 23, 2002; Accepted December 17, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

Normal elderly and mildly aphasic individuals may exhibit similar impairments in comprehension and expression. The discriminative validity between normal and aphasic performance on most standardized measures of aphasia has not been reported. The authors compared the performance of 18 aphasic and 18 normal adults to determine the discriminative validity of 2 general language measures—the Porch Index of Communicative Ability (B. E. Porch, 1967) and the Western Aphasia Battery (A. Kertesz, 1982)—and 2 functional communication measures—the Communication Activities of Daily Living-Second Edition (A. L. Holland, C. Frattali, & D. Fromm, 1999) and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s Functional Assessment of Communication Skills for Adults (C. Frattali, C. K. Thompson, A. L. Holland, C. B. Wohl, & M. K. Ferketic, 1995). All between-groups comparisons of summary scores for each measure showed significant mean differences. Expressive language ability and efficiency of performance best differentiated between the aphasic and normal groups. However, group performance ranges overlapped by at least 10% on each measure. To enhance the differential diagnosis of aphasia, supplementing formal test results with additional subjective and objective evidence is recommended.

Acknowledgments
This study was conducted at the VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN, and was supported, in part, by a predoctoral fellowship from the Department of Veterans Affairs and by the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. A summary of the results was presented in November 2000 as a poster session at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Washington, DC. We thank Daniel Ashmead, Fred Bess, Frank Freemon, and Ralph Ohde for valuable discussion.
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