Training Day Care Staff to Facilitate Children’s Language This exploratory study investigated the outcome of in-service training on language facilitation strategies of child care providers in day care centers. Sixteen caregivers were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Caregivers were taught to be responsive to children’s initiations, engage children in interactions, model simplified language, and encourage peer ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2003
Training Day Care Staff to Facilitate Children’s Language
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Luigi Girolametto, PhD
    University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Elaine Weitzman
    The Hanen Centre Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Janice Greenberg
    The Hanen Centre Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Luigi Girolametto, PhD, Graduate Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, 500 University Avenue, 10th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1V7, Canada.
    Contact author: Luigi Girolametto, PhD, Graduate Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, 500 University Avenue, 10th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1V7, Canada.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: l.girolametto@utoronto.ca
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2003
Training Day Care Staff to Facilitate Children’s Language
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2003, Vol. 12, 299-311. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/076)
History: Received January 23, 2003 , Accepted December 6, 2003
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2003, Vol. 12, 299-311. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/076)
History: Received January 23, 2003; Accepted December 6, 2003
Web of Science® Times Cited: 50

This exploratory study investigated the outcome of in-service training on language facilitation strategies of child care providers in day care centers. Sixteen caregivers were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. Caregivers were taught to be responsive to children’s initiations, engage children in interactions, model simplified language, and encourage peer interactions. At posttest, the experimental group waited for children to initiate, engaged them in turn-taking, used face to face interaction, and included uninvolved children more frequently than the control group. In turn, children in the experimental group talked more, produced more combinations, and talked to peers more often than the control group. The results support the viability of this training model in early childhood education settings and suggest directions for future research.

Acknowledgments
This study was sponsored by a grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. We thank Maureen O’Keefe, research officer, for her guidance, patience, and help in every step of this project, from recruitment to data collection and data transcription. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Christiane Kyte for rating videotapes and Salma Syed, Sheila Irvine, Audrey D’Souza, and Sharon Manders for their help with transcription of the videotaped caregiver–child interactions. Above all, we are deeply appreciative of the participation of the day care supervisors, the child care providers, and the children’s families.
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