Predictors of Phonological Change Following Intervention To date, predictor variables strongly associated with phonological change as a result of intervention have not been identified. The purpose of this study was to determine the best predictor or combination of predictors of change in percentage of consonants correct (PCC; L. D. Shriberg & J. Kwiatkowski, 1982) as a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2003
Predictors of Phonological Change Following Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ann A. Tyler, PhD
    University of Nevada, Reno
  • Kerry E. Lewis
    University of Nevada, Reno
  • Carissa M. Welch
    Washoe County School District, Reno, NV
  • Contact author: Ann A. Tyler, PhD, School of Medicine, Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, Nell J. Redfield Bldg./152, Reno, NV 89557.
    Contact author: Ann A. Tyler, PhD, School of Medicine, Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, Nell J. Redfield Bldg./152, Reno, NV 89557.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: anntyler@med.unr.edu
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2003
Predictors of Phonological Change Following Intervention
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2003, Vol. 12, 289-298. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/075)
History: Received November 16, 2001 , Accepted November 13, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2003, Vol. 12, 289-298. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/075)
History: Received November 16, 2001; Accepted November 13, 2002

To date, predictor variables strongly associated with phonological change as a result of intervention have not been identified. The purpose of this study was to determine the best predictor or combination of predictors of change in percentage of consonants correct (PCC; L. D. Shriberg & J. Kwiatkowski, 1982) as a result of speech-language intervention for a group of 20 participants and to replicate this procedure with a second group of 20. Participants were preschool children, ages 3;0 (years;months) to 5;11, with impairments in phonology and morphosyntax who received intervention focused on both phonology and morphosyntax in different goal attack configurations. The relationship of predictor variables chronological age, inventory size, error consistency, and expressive language to the criterion variable, change in PCC, was investigated. In both the initial study and the replication, the mean change in PCC following a 24-week intervention period was 13.1%. In the initial study, error consistency and a finite morpheme composite (FMC; L. M. Bedore & L. B. Leonard, 1998) accounted for 52% of the variance for the criterion variable. Error consistency at the first step in the regression accounted for 31.6% of the variance. In the replication, error consistency was the only variable related to PCC change, again accounting for 31% of the variance. Further research examining overall error consistency is warranted.

Acknowledgments
This article is based, in part, on the third author’s master’s thesis completed in May 2000 at the University of Nevada, Reno. This research was supported in part by a grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to the University of Nevada, Reno (DC03358). We also wish to express our thanks to the children, their parents, and the Washoe County School District SLPs and teachers who participated in this research.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access