Assessment of Phonology in Preschool African American Vernacular English Speakers Using an Alternate Response Mode The purpose of this study was to determine whether an adapted stimulus elicitation format would reduce the amount of final consonant absence in African American Vernacular English (AAVE) speakers and to determine the extent to which the adapted and standard response formats would differ in their predictions of membership in ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 2003
Assessment of Phonology in Preschool African American Vernacular English Speakers Using an Alternate Response Mode
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandra P. Laing, PhD
    University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
  • Contact author: Sandra P. Laing, PhD, University of Alabama, Speech and Hearing Center, #7 Rowand Johnson Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0242.
    Contact author: Sandra P. Laing, PhD, University of Alabama, Speech and Hearing Center, #7 Rowand Johnson Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0242.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: slaing@cd.as.us.edu
Article Information
Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 2003
Assessment of Phonology in Preschool African American Vernacular English Speakers Using an Alternate Response Mode
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2003, Vol. 12, 273-281. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/073)
History: Received October 8, 2001 , Accepted October 21, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2003, Vol. 12, 273-281. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/073)
History: Received October 8, 2001; Accepted October 21, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

The purpose of this study was to determine whether an adapted stimulus elicitation format would reduce the amount of final consonant absence in African American Vernacular English (AAVE) speakers and to determine the extent to which the adapted and standard response formats would differ in their predictions of membership in a delayed and a typical group. Findings revealed that the alternate response mode resulted in statistically significant decreases in the use of final consonant absence and that it was less likely than the standard response mode to penalize the AAVE speaker to a degree that was clinically significant.

Acknowledgments
I would like to express appreciation to the graduate students, Betty Carver, Barbara Burgess, and Debra McCrary, and to the faculty and staff at the W. Alabama Head Start programs who participated in this project. I would like to extend a special thanks to Ken Bleile, Carol Stoel-Gammon, Karen Pollock, and William Haynes.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access