A Thematic Analysis of Late Recovery From Stuttering This study used thematic analysis to gain a better understanding of the experiences of individuals who reported late recovery from stuttering. Using a semistructured interview, 6 adults who reported recovering from stuttering after the age of 10 were asked to relate their recovery stories, with particular emphasis on their perceptions ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2003
A Thematic Analysis of Late Recovery From Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tracy K. Anderson
    Northern Rhode Island Collaborative, Cumberland, RI
  • Susan Felsenfeld, PhD
    Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Contact author: Susan Felsenfeld, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282. E-mail: felsenfeld@duq.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2003
A Thematic Analysis of Late Recovery From Stuttering
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2003, Vol. 12, 243-253. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/070)
History: Received April 13, 2001 , Accepted August 26, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2003, Vol. 12, 243-253. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/070)
History: Received April 13, 2001; Accepted August 26, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 35

This study used thematic analysis to gain a better understanding of the experiences of individuals who reported late recovery from stuttering. Using a semistructured interview, 6 adults who reported recovering from stuttering after the age of 10 were asked to relate their recovery stories, with particular emphasis on their perceptions of factors responsible for the recovery process. The interviews were parsed into information-rich quotations that were ultimately placed into thematic categories. Three thematic categories appeared to capture the majority of the recovery attributions: (a) increased confidence; (b) increased motivation, expressed as a desire to make positive changes in speech; and (c) direct speech changes. Narrative case studies were subsequently developed to illustrate the 3 different "pathways to recovery" that were described by our participants.

Acknowledgments
This article was based on a master's thesis completed by Tracy K. Anderson while at Duquesne University. Support was provided by a grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (DC03776) awarded to Susan Felsenfeld. Portions of this study were presented at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, November 2000, in Washington, DC. The authors would like to thank Shelly Caldwell, Tiffani Kirchner, John Myers, Melissa Petyk, and Jill Reilly for their assistance in completing the speech naturalness and reliability analyses. We would also like to acknowledge the valuable input provided by Patrick Finn, who reviewed an earlier version of this article. Finally, our sincere gratitude is extended to the participants who so willingly shared their personal stories.
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