Language Functioning of Residents in Family Homeless Shelters The number of individuals who are homeless is rising, particularly among families (typically mothers) with preschool children. This study examined the speech-language abilities of 25 mothers and their preschool children residing in urban homeless shelters. Results of standardized testing revealed that the majority of the mothers and their preschool children ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2003
Language Functioning of Residents in Family Homeless Shelters
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Therese M. O'Neil-Pirozzi
    Northeastern University, Boston
  • Contact author: Therese M. O’Neil-Pirozzi, Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, 103 Forsyth Building, Boston, MA 02115. E-mail: toneilpi@lynx.dac.neu.edu
Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2003
Language Functioning of Residents in Family Homeless Shelters
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2003, Vol. 12, 229-242. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/069)
History: Received August 17, 2001 , Accepted August 22, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2003, Vol. 12, 229-242. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/069)
History: Received August 17, 2001; Accepted August 22, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

The number of individuals who are homeless is rising, particularly among families (typically mothers) with preschool children. This study examined the speech-language abilities of 25 mothers and their preschool children residing in urban homeless shelters. Results of standardized testing revealed that the majority of the mothers and their preschool children presented with overall language deficits or delays which were present in at least 1 of 4 language modalities: auditory comprehension, verbal expression, reading, and writing. Clinical and research implications of these results for both the mothers and their children are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The Northeastern University Research and Scholarship Development Fund supported this study.
Appreciation is extended to graduate students majoring in speech-language pathology at Northeastern University who were involved in this project: Lisa Auclair, Shannon Bonner, Michelle Borelli, Tina DiBlasi, Kate Gallagher, Shammi Ghelani, Jocelyn Hendrickson, Glenna Hennessey, Nikki Joacham, Sara Lapsley, Lisa McCarthy, Samantha Panet, Lisa Patchett, Leanne Rabinowitz, Monique Schmitt, Rebecca Snyder, Maria Streletz, Cathy Walencis, and Meredith Zechello. Gratitude is extended to the families and staff at the participating homeless shelters for their interest in, and support of, this study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access