The Effect of Clinical Experience on Cue Trading for the /r-w/ Contrast Although the ability of clinicians to perceptually process speech sound productions is a key ingredient in the evaluation and remediation of articulatory disorders, very little attention has been given to this important skill. This study explored the potential of a perceptual task, known as cue trading, to assess perceptual skill ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2003
The Effect of Clinical Experience on Cue Trading for the /r-w/ Contrast
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Virginia Wolfe, PhD
    Auburn University Montgomery, Montgomery, AL
  • David Martin
    Auburn University Montgomery, Montgomery, AL
  • Thomas Borton
    Auburn University Montgomery, Montgomery, AL
  • Heather Conner Youngblood
    Auburn University Montgomery, Montgomery, AL
  • Contact author: Virginia Wolfe, PhD, AUM Speech and Hearing Clinic, 7041 Senators Drive, Liberal Arts Building #110, Montgomery, AL 36117. E-mail: vwolfe@mail.aum.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Professional Issues & Training / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2003
The Effect of Clinical Experience on Cue Trading for the /r-w/ Contrast
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2003, Vol. 12, 221-228. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/068)
History: Received November 2, 2000 , Accepted August 19, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2003, Vol. 12, 221-228. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/068)
History: Received November 2, 2000; Accepted August 19, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Although the ability of clinicians to perceptually process speech sound productions is a key ingredient in the evaluation and remediation of articulatory disorders, very little attention has been given to this important skill. This study explored the potential of a perceptual task, known as cue trading, to assess perceptual skill among students with varying clinical experience. A cue-trading paradigm for the /r-w/ contrast was used in which a temporal-spectral cue on F2 was balanced against a spectral cue on F3. Results indicated a trading relationship for all students. However, students without clinical experience demonstrated reduced sensitivity to the acoustic cues for /w/ and identification functions that were less clearly separated compared to students with clinical experience. Furthermore, the magnitude of the difference between functions (the trading relationship) was significantly smaller for students without practicum experience: They showed weaker phonetic percepts for /r/ and /w/ than did the students with practicum experience. Preliminary results suggest that a task based on cue trading could be useful in assessing perceptual sensitivity to the acoustic cues representative of misarticulated /r/.

Acknowledgment
Partial support for this project was received from the Auburn University Montgomery Grant-In-Aid Program.
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