Effects of Presentation Mode and Repeated Familiarization on Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech Clinical measures of speech intelligibility are widely used as one means of characterizing the speech of individuals with dysarthria. Many variables associated with both the speaker and the listener contribute to what is actually measured as intelligibility. The present study explored the effects of presentation modality (audiovisual vs. audio-only information) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2003
Effects of Presentation Mode and Repeated Familiarization on Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katherine C. Hustad, PhD
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Meghan A. Cahill
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Contact author: Katherine C. Hustad, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, 110 Moore Building, University Park, PA 16802. E-mail: kch2@psu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2003
Effects of Presentation Mode and Repeated Familiarization on Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2003, Vol. 12, 198-208. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/066)
History: Received June 8, 2002 , Accepted July 23, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2003, Vol. 12, 198-208. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/066)
History: Received June 8, 2002; Accepted July 23, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 43

Clinical measures of speech intelligibility are widely used as one means of characterizing the speech of individuals with dysarthria. Many variables associated with both the speaker and the listener contribute to what is actually measured as intelligibility. The present study explored the effects of presentation modality (audiovisual vs. audio-only information) and the effects of speaker-specific familiarization across 4 trials on the intelligibility of speakers with mild and severe dysarthria associated with cerebral palsy. Results revealed that audiovisual information did not enhance intelligibility relative to audio-only information for 4 of the 5 speakers studied. The one speaker whose intelligibility increased when audiovisual information was presented had the most severe dysarthria and concomitant motor impairments. Results for speaker-specific repeated familiarization were relatively homogeneous across speakers, demonstrating significant intelligibility score improvements across 4 trials and, in particular, a significant improvement in intelligibility between the 1st and 4th trials.

Acknowledgments
We wish to express special thanks to the speakers with dysarthria who participated in this study. We also wish to thank Dr. Robert Prosek for the use of his sound suite to conduct this research. Finally, we acknowledge Amanda Creager, Francesca DiNatale, and Aimee Xander for their assistance with making stimulus tapes and collecting data from listeners.
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