The ICF A Proposed Framework for Comprehensive Rehabilitation of Individuals Who Use Alaryngeal Speech Tutorial
Tutorial  |   May 01, 2003
The ICF
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tanya L. Eadie, PhD
    University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Tanya L. Eadie, PhD, Voice Production and Perception Laboratory, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6G 1H1. E-mail: teadie@uwo.ca
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   May 01, 2003
The ICF
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2003, Vol. 12, 189-197. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/065)
History: Received April 12, 2002 , Accepted September 3, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2003, Vol. 12, 189-197. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/065)
History: Received April 12, 2002; Accepted September 3, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 30

The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provides a conceptual framework and common language for describing human functioning and disability (World Health Organization, 2001). The ICF provides direction for comprehensive rehabilitation by classifying individual functioning at the levels of (a) body functions and structures and (b) activities and participation. Consequently, the purpose of this article is (a) to summarize the ICF; (b) to apply a case example to the framework of the ICF, involving individuals who have undergone total laryngectomy; and (c) to examine implications for both research and clinical practice. This article demonstrates how speech-language pathologists may apply the ICF framework and endorses the adoption of the framework by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in the 2001 Scope of Practice in Speech-Language Pathology.

Acknowledgments
I wish to acknowledge the support of my supervisor, Dr. Philip Doyle, a master clinician and a progressive researcher in the area of head and neck cancer. I also wish to acknowledge members of my comprehensive committee in the Doctoral Program in Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Western Ontario and the funding support of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
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