Blending Quantitative and Qualitative Methods in Language Research and Intervention Best practice in speech-language pathology should be informed by current research findings. Traditional research methods are not always geared to address some of the complex, individual questions that arise in clinical intervention, however. Qualitative research methods may provide useful tools for bridging the gap from research to practice. Combinations of ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   May 01, 2003
Blending Quantitative and Qualitative Methods in Language Research and Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bonnie Brinton, PhD
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Martin Fujiki
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Contact author: Bonnie Brinton, PhD, B-380 ASB, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602. E-mail: bonnie_brinton@byu.edu
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Clinical Forum: Qualitative Research
Clinical Forum   |   May 01, 2003
Blending Quantitative and Qualitative Methods in Language Research and Intervention
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2003, Vol. 12, 165-171. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/063)
History: Received December 18, 2001 , Accepted August 19, 2002
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2003, Vol. 12, 165-171. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2003/063)
History: Received December 18, 2001; Accepted August 19, 2002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

Best practice in speech-language pathology should be informed by current research findings. Traditional research methods are not always geared to address some of the complex, individual questions that arise in clinical intervention, however. Qualitative research methods may provide useful tools for bridging the gap from research to practice. Combinations of qualitative and quantitative procedures may be particularly helpful in sorting out some of the important issues surrounding language intervention in both clinical and research contexts. Examples of research blending qualitative and quantitative methods, as well as the case study of Sid, an 11-year-old boy with specific language impairment, are presented to illustrate how a combination of procedures can be used to enhance language research and intervention.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank the McKay School of Education, Brigham Young University, for research support. We would like to acknowledge Sid and his parents for their ongoing support of our work. We would also like to thank Michael and Barbara for patience and understanding under fire.
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