A Comparison of Mothers' Individual and Simultaneous Book Sharing With Preschool Siblings An Exploratory Study of Five Families Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2002
A Comparison of Mothers' Individual and Simultaneous Book Sharing With Preschool Siblings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne van Kleeck
    University of Georgia, Athens
  • Amy Beckley-McCall
    Moriarity School District, Edgewood, NM
  • Contact author: Anne van Kleeck, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 516 Aderhold Hall, The University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, 30602-7152. E-mail: avk@coe.uga.edu
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2002
A Comparison of Mothers' Individual and Simultaneous Book Sharing With Preschool Siblings
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2002, Vol. 11, 175-189. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/017)
History: Received January 22, 2001 , Accepted September 26, 2001
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2002, Vol. 11, 175-189. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/017)
History: Received January 22, 2001; Accepted September 26, 2001

Many studies have demonstrated that adults fine tune book-sharing discussions to the developmental levels of preschoolers, but little is known regarding how reading simultaneously to different-aged preschoolers is negotiated. We observed five mothers of different-aged preschoolers sharing books with each child individually and with both children together. Analyses focused on the linguistic complexity of the book, the amount of time spent sharing a book, and on several aspects of the mothers' book-sharing mediation. Results revealed developmental differences on several measures of how mothers mediated with younger as compared to older children individually. Book complexity, the time spent sharing books, and the percent of utterances at higher levels of abstraction were higher when reading to the older children; the number of mediation strategies per minute and the percent of mothers' behaviors that were used to get and maintain attention were higher when reading to the younger children. When reading to both children simultaneously, which aspects of the mediation fell at these different levels varied among the different mothers. This suggests that different mothers reach different solutions to the task of simultaneously reading to preschoolers of different ages. One mother approached the simultaneous book sharing much as she did sharing a book with her older child, one mother approached it as she did with her younger child, one mother simply read and did little mediation, and two mothers appeared to use a mixed strategy in the simultaneous reading condition.

Acknowledgment
The author would like to thank Lisa Hammett for her helpful comments and her input regarding the clinical implications of this study.
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