Speaking Slowly Effects of Four Self-Guided Training Approaches on Adults' Speech Rate and Naturalness Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2002
Speaking Slowly
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenneth J. Logan
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Rosalyn R. Roberts
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Aneesha P. Pretto
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Megan J. Morey
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Contact Author: Kenneth J. Logan, P.O. Box 117420, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 358 Dauer Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7420. E-mail: logan@csd.ufl.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2002
Speaking Slowly
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2002, Vol. 11, 163-174. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/016)
History: Received February 23, 2001 , Accepted August 2, 2001
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2002, Vol. 11, 163-174. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/016)
History: Received February 23, 2001; Accepted August 2, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

Speech-language pathologists often ask parents of children who stutter to reduce their conversational pace when talking with their children. Little is known, however, about how best to help parents accomplish this task. Two experiments were conducted to examine this issue. In Experiment 1, adult females altered speech rate via one of four self-guided methods. Post-training speech rates for all four experimental groups (n=8) were significantly slower than those of speakers in a control group. The extent of rate reduction varied significantly across groups, and speakers rated their resultant speech as unnatural. In Experiment 2, 39 female listeners rated the naturalness of sentences from the five groups in Experiment 1. Naturalness ratings were higher for the Control group than for a group using a self-devised rate-reduction method (SDM). In turn, SDM ratings were higher than those for groups trained to alter articulation rate and intra-sentence pauses. Across groups, the slower a speaker's post-training speech rate, the less natural listeners judged the speech to sound (r = 95). Results suggest that although none of the methods were clearly superior, adults can readily produce moderately slower, relatively natural sounding speech using self-devised methods. Speakers' and listeners' perceptions of speech naturalness may differ considerably, however, and this must be considered during training.

Acknowledgments
Kenneth J. Logan, University of Florida and Rosalyn R. Roberts, University of Florida; Aneesha Pretto, University of Florida, now at the Free University of Brussels, Belgium; Megan J. Morey, University of Florida, now at the University of Central Florida.
This research was supported in part by awards to the second and third authors from the Ronald E. McNair Post Baccalaureatee Achievement Program. Thanks to Kristin Henderson, Lindsey Metcalf, and Sonali Shah for their assistance with data analysis.
Portions of this paper were presented at the Third World Congress on Fluency Disorders in Nyborg, Denmark in August 2000, and at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Washington, DC in November 2000.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access