Black and White Adults' Expressive Language Performance on Three Tests of Aphasia Few or no Black adults have been included in normative samples for tests of aphasia, nor have test and item bias with Black adults been evaluated for such popular tests as the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE; Goodglass & Kaplan, 1983), the Minnesota est for Differential Diagnosis of Aphasia (MTDDA; ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2002
Black and White Adults' Expressive Language Performance on Three Tests of Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charlotte J. Molrine, PhD
    Edinboro University of Pennsylvania
  • Robert S. Pierce
    Kent State University, OH
  • Contact author: Charlotte J. Molrine, PhD, Department of Speech & Communication Studies, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Edinboro, PA 16444. E-mail: cmolrine@edinboro.edu
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2002
Black and White Adults' Expressive Language Performance on Three Tests of Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2002, Vol. 11, 139-150. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/014)
History: Received November 8, 2000 , Accepted June 4, 2001
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2002, Vol. 11, 139-150. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/014)
History: Received November 8, 2000; Accepted June 4, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Few or no Black adults have been included in normative samples for tests of aphasia, nor have test and item bias with Black adults been evaluated for such popular tests as the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination (BDAE; Goodglass & Kaplan, 1983), the Minnesota est for Differential Diagnosis of Aphasia (MTDDA; Schuell, 1965), and the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB; Kertesz, 1982). To address this, group differences were investigated in expressive language test performance on the BDAE, MTDDA, and WAB by 48 nonbrain-damaged Black (n=24) and White (n = 24) adults. Each test was administered by a White female examiner and audiotaped. The responses of subjects and subject foils with aphasia were scored by graduate speech-language pathology students who were blind to the purpose of the study. A comparison of the test scores on the expressive language subtests revealed that, with the exception of three subtests, there were no statistically significant differences in obtained scores for upper and middle SES subjects. Those differences that were found were not a function of age, gender, or social network status. Moreover, differences in subtest performance were not obviously due to grammatical or phonological features of African American English (AAE), but rather to task-related AAE style differences.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by grants from the State System of Higher Education Faculty Professional Development Program and from the Edinboro University of Pennsylvania Senate Research Committee.
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