The Use of Rating Scales With Children Who Have Language Impairments Several reports suggest that socio-emotional disorders and language impairments frequently co-occur in children receiving special education services. One explanation for the high levels of co-occurrence is that limitations inherent to linguistic deficiencies are frequently misinterpreted as symptomatic of underlying socioemotional pathology. In this report, five commonly used behavioral rating scales ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   May 01, 2002
The Use of Rating Scales With Children Who Have Language Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sean M. Redmond, PhD
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Contact Author: Sean M. Redmond, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Utah, 390 S. 1530 E. BEHS Rm. 1201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0252. E-mail: sean.redmond@health.utah.edu
Article Information
Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   May 01, 2002
The Use of Rating Scales With Children Who Have Language Impairments
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2002, Vol. 11, 124-138. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/013)
History: Received June 20, 2001 , Accepted October 20, 2001
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2002, Vol. 11, 124-138. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/013)
History: Received June 20, 2001; Accepted October 20, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 22

Several reports suggest that socio-emotional disorders and language impairments frequently co-occur in children receiving special education services. One explanation for the high levels of co-occurrence is that limitations inherent to linguistic deficiencies are frequently misinterpreted as symptomatic of underlying socioemotional pathology. In this report, five commonly used behavioral rating scales are examined in light of language bias. Results of the review indicated that children with language impairments are likely to be overidentified as having socioemotional disorders. An implication of these findings is that speech-language pathologists need to increase their involvement in socioemotional evaluations to ensure that children with language impairments as a group are not unduly penalized for their language limitations. Specific guidelines for using ratings with children with language impairments are provided.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access