Cause and Effect in Stuttering: An Examination of the Anticipatory Struggle Hypothesis In this most recent defense of the anticipatory struggle hypothesis, Dr. Bloodstein maintains that there is no neurophysiological basis to stuttering in its advanced form, and that stuttering is caused solely by the person’s learned and erroneous belief that certain words are difficult to say without stuttering. According to ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   November 01, 2000
Cause and Effect in Stuttering: An Examination of the Anticipatory Struggle Hypothesis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ann Packman
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre Lidcombe, NSW, Australia
  • Mark Onslow
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre Lidcombe, NSW, Australia
  • Contact author: Ann Packman, PhD, Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe NSW 1825, Australia. E-mail: a.packman@cchs.usyd.edu.au
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   November 01, 2000
Cause and Effect in Stuttering: An Examination of the Anticipatory Struggle Hypothesis
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2000, Vol. 9, 359-360. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0904.359
History: Received September 20, 2000 , Accepted September 21, 2000
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2000, Vol. 9, 359-360. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0904.359
History: Received September 20, 2000; Accepted September 21, 2000
In this most recent defense of the anticipatory struggle hypothesis, Dr. Bloodstein maintains that there is no neurophysiological basis to stuttering in its advanced form, and that stuttering is caused solely by the person’s learned and erroneous belief that certain words are difficult to say without stuttering. According to the anticipatory struggle hypothesis, this anticipation results in tension which in turn results in stuttering. Dr. Bloodstein claims that Packman, Menzies, and Onslow (2000) are wrong when they suggest that this proposition is impossible to verify experimentally, although he does not say how this might be done. He says that, in any event, it is not critical to test a hypothesis if it is supported by observation. Dr. Bloodstein also suggests that Packman et al. are misguided in asserting that recent findings on genetic and constitutional factors are inconsistent with the anticipatory struggle hypothesis.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access