Multiple Oppositions Theoretical Foundations for an Alternative Contrastive Intervention Approach Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   November 01, 2000
Multiple Oppositions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Lynn Williams
    East Tennessee State University, Johnson City
  • Contact author: A. Lynn Williams, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, P.O. Box 70643, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614. E-mail: williaml@etsu.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   November 01, 2000
Multiple Oppositions
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2000, Vol. 9, 282-288. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0904.282
History: Received December 20, 1999 , Accepted August 2, 2000
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2000, Vol. 9, 282-288. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0904.282
History: Received December 20, 1999; Accepted August 2, 2000

A multiple opposition approach to phonological intervention is described as an alternative contrastive approach for the treatment of severe speech disorders in children. The development and theoretical constructs of this approach are presented within the context of a clinical case study. The multiple opposition approach is based on the premise that the systemic level of phonological organization is essential in the description and intervention of disordered sound systems. Phonological descriptions identify phoneme collapses, which are viewed as phonologic strategies developed by the child to accommodate a limited sound system relative to the full adult system of the ambient language. Intervention is then directed systemically across the child’s entire rule, or collapse, by using larger treatment sets of multiple oppositions rather than by one contrast at a time.

Author’s Note
Preparation of this paper was supported in part by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (DC03493) and a small grant from the Research and Development Committee at East Tennessee State University. Portions of this paper were presented at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Seattle, 1990.
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