Enhancing Children’s Print and Word Awareness Through Home-Based Parent Intervention This investigation examined the efficacy of a home-based book reading intervention program for enhancing parents’ use of print-referencing behaviors and for stimulating children’s early literacy skills in the areas of print and word awareness. Participants included 28 parents and their typically developing 4-year-old children. Each dyad was assigned to a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2000
Enhancing Children’s Print and Word Awareness Through Home-Based Parent Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura M. Justice
    Ohio University, Athens
  • Helen K. Ezell
    Ohio University, Athens
  • Contact author: Laura Justice, PhD, Communication Disorders Program, University of Virginia, 2205 Fontaine Avenue, Suite 202, PO Box 800781, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0781. Email: Laura@childlanguage.net
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2000
Enhancing Children’s Print and Word Awareness Through Home-Based Parent Intervention
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2000, Vol. 9, 257-269. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0903.257
History: Received January 19, 2000 , Accepted June 15, 2000
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2000, Vol. 9, 257-269. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0903.257
History: Received January 19, 2000; Accepted June 15, 2000

This investigation examined the efficacy of a home-based book reading intervention program for enhancing parents’ use of print-referencing behaviors and for stimulating children’s early literacy skills in the areas of print and word awareness. Participants included 28 parents and their typically developing 4-year-old children. Each dyad was assigned to a control or experimental group, using a pretest-posttest control group research design. Pretest measures of parents’ book-reading behaviors and children’s early literacy skills were collected. Each dyad then completed a home-based shared reading program, in which they read two books each week over a 4-week period. Parents in the experimental group were instructed to use nonverbal and verbal print-referencing behaviors in their reading sessions. Control group parents did not receive this instruction. Posttest measures found that parents in the experimental group showed a significant increase in their use of verbal and nonverbal references to print. Results also indicated that parental use of these print-referencing behaviors significantly enhanced their children’s early literacy skills in several areas of print and word awareness. Clinical implications of this intervention are discussed.

Author Note
This project was supported in part by a Student-Initiated Research Grant in Early Childhood Language from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation and the Arlene Matkin Memorial Fund. Additional financial support was provided by the School of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Ohio University.
The authors would like to thank Sarah Biel, who assisted on a broad array of tasks regarding this project, as well as three individuals who kindly volunteered their time to serve as research assistants on this project: Nicole Stottlemeyer, Lori Summe, and Suzanne Roth. The authors would also like to thank Cindy Poole, who consulted on statistical analyses. Sincere appreciation is expressed to the families who worked so diligently to complete all project activities.
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