The Acquisition of Fricatives and Affricates: Evidence From a Disordered Phonological System This study describes the acquisition of the entire fricative and affricate sound classes by a child with a disordered phonological system and other co-occurring conditions. Pretreatment, the participant, age 5;3 (years; months), produced homorganic stops for all fricatives and affricates. Two fricatives, /v/ and /z/, were taught one at a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2000
The Acquisition of Fricatives and Affricates: Evidence From a Disordered Phonological System
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Adele W. Miccio
    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Dennis R. Ingrisano
    University of Northern Colorado, Greeley
  • Contact author: Adele W. Miccio, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, 222 Moore Building, University Park, PA 16802. Email: awm4@psu.edu
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2000
The Acquisition of Fricatives and Affricates: Evidence From a Disordered Phonological System
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2000, Vol. 9, 214-229. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0903.214
History: Received October 13, 1999 , Accepted May 11, 2000
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2000, Vol. 9, 214-229. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0903.214
History: Received October 13, 1999; Accepted May 11, 2000

This study describes the acquisition of the entire fricative and affricate sound classes by a child with a disordered phonological system and other co-occurring conditions. Pretreatment, the participant, age 5;3 (years; months), produced homorganic stops for all fricatives and affricates. Two fricatives, /v/ and /z/, were taught one at a time in the word-initial position, first by imitation and then in minimally paired words to test hypotheses regarding the generalization of the features [continuant] and [strident] across word positions and sound classes. The 26-week treatment followed cognitive-linguistic principles and resulted in reorganization of the sound system to include the fricative and affricate sound classes.

Author Note
We are grateful to two anonymous reviewers for their detailed and thoughtful comments on earlier versions of this manuscript. This research was supported in part by Grant 1R03HD37586-01 awarded by the National Institutes of Health—National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.
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