From the Editor This issue of the Journal contains many excellent papers, all with strong clinical implications. For instance, Greenberg and Fifer present a case study of a child who has 22q11 deletion syndrome and with whom hypernasality was a critical issue. The message of the case report is that identification of ... Editorial
Editorial  |   August 01, 2000
From the Editor
 
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Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   August 01, 2000
From the Editor
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2000, Vol. 9, 178. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0903.178
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2000, Vol. 9, 178. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0903.178
This issue of the Journal contains many excellent papers, all with strong clinical implications. For instance, Greenberg and Fifer present a case study of a child who has 22q11 deletion syndrome and with whom hypernasality was a critical issue. The message of the case report is that identification of a syndrome may assist professionals in providing appropriate and timely services. Van Borsel, Morlion, van Snick, and Leroy present two children who have Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Their case reports include detailed phonetic inventories, and they use the error patterns to assist in determining the source of the errors. Miccio and Ingrisano present in detail the acquisition of the affricate and fricative sound classes by a child with disordered phonology. As well, this work points to an intervention for disordered phonological systems in children that is rooted in cognitive-linguistic theory, pointing to a close merger of science and clinical practice. DePaul and Kent studied the effects of listener proficiency and familiarization on judgments of speech intelligibility and speech severity associated with a progressive dysarthria. Results have the clinical message that speech intelligibility is a critical issue in assessing progressive dysarthrias and that clinicians should potentially use familiarization training and listener proficiency ratings as part of a standard of intelligibility assessment. Pearl Solomon, McKee, Larson, Nawrocki, Tuite, Eriksen, Low, and Maxwell present some of the first controlled data on the effects of pallidal stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease on speech—the ultimate finding being that patients who undergo such surgical intervention may require speech treatment as well. Justice and Ezell discuss the utility of a home-based book reading intervention program for enhancing parents’ use of print-referencing behaviors and for stimulating children’s early literacy skills in the areas of print and word awareness. This program may have implications for treating children with language disorders.
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