Letter to the Editor I write in support of your response to Thomas Sowell’s “How Experts Harm Our Kids.” As a member of this profession since 1947, I have participated in its evolution. With the advent of neurolinguistics and psycholinguis-tics, members of our profession were among the primary investigators, with NIH support, of ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   May 01, 2000
Letter to the Editor
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William H. Perkins
    Professor Emeritus University of Southern California
  • Contact author: William H. Perkins, PhD, 5425 Weatherford Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90008
    Contact author: William H. Perkins, PhD, 5425 Weatherford Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90008×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   May 01, 2000
Letter to the Editor
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2000, Vol. 9, 173. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0902.173
History: Received March 27, 2000 , Accepted April 5, 2000
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2000, Vol. 9, 173. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0902.173
History: Received March 27, 2000; Accepted April 5, 2000
I write in support of your response to Thomas Sowell’s “How Experts Harm Our Kids.” As a member of this profession since 1947, I have participated in its evolution. With the advent of neurolinguistics and psycholinguis-tics, members of our profession were among the primary investigators, with NIH support, of speech and language development and its disorders. Much of this work has been done in conjunction with pediatricians. We are not at war with them, as Sowell would seem to have it— we collaborate with them.
Their primary concern is medical, in which we are not experts. Our province is cognitive and behavioral. We need them; they need us. These are the dimensions by which speech and language problems have been dealt with effectively. Speech and language developmental disorders can be manifestations of underlying medical conditions. But these manifestations are cognitive, linguistic, and behavioral. Medical intervention can improve the underlying biological conditions and may be a necessary precursor to treatment. But delayed speech, in the final analysis, is a learning problem.
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