Anxiety and the Anticipatory Struggle Hypothesis We are pleased that our recent article about stuttering and anxiety (Menzies, Onslow, & Packman, 1999) has elicited a response from Dr. Bloodstein, and we appreciate having this opportunity to engage in a dialogue with him. In the history of this field, Dr. Bloodstein’s promotion of the anticipatory struggle ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   February 01, 2000
Anxiety and the Anticipatory Struggle Hypothesis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ann Packman
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre The University of Sydney
  • Ross G. Menzies
    School of Behavioural and Community Health Services The University of Sydney
  • Mark Onslow
    Australian Stuttering Research Centre The University of Sydney
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   February 01, 2000
Anxiety and the Anticipatory Struggle Hypothesis
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2000, Vol. 9, 88-89. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0901.88
History: Received August 3, 1999 , Accepted September 29, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2000, Vol. 9, 88-89. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0901.88
History: Received August 3, 1999; Accepted September 29, 1999
We are pleased that our recent article about stuttering and anxiety (Menzies, Onslow, & Packman, 1999) has elicited a response from Dr. Bloodstein, and we appreciate having this opportunity to engage in a dialogue with him. In the history of this field, Dr. Bloodstein’s promotion of the anticipatory struggle hypothesis has profoundly influenced the way we think about stuttering and those who stutter. One positive outcome of our article is that, in his response, Dr. Bloodstein has clarified for us the role of anxiety in this hypothesis. Dr. Bloodstein states that stuttering is triggered by the speaker’s “baseless cognition” (p. 87) that a word will be difficult to say, but that this cognition—or belief—is not synonymous with anxiety. According to this argument, then, while this baseless belief must be present for stuttering to occur, anxiety need not. In Dr. Bloodstein’s words, “if the anticipatory struggle concept is valid, anxiety is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for stuttering” (p. 87).
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