Anxiety and Stuttering: Some Thoughts On Reading Menzies, Onslow, and Packman (1999) In a recent issue of AJSLP, Menzies, Onslow, and Packman (1999)  contend that there is a clear and significant relationship between stuttering and anxiety despite certain negative research findings. My purpose in this letter is not to argue otherwise. Indeed, it would be difficult for any clinician who has ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   February 01, 2000
Anxiety and Stuttering: Some Thoughts On Reading Menzies, Onslow, and Packman (1999)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Oliver Bloodstein
    Brooklyn College Brooklyn, NY
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   February 01, 2000
Anxiety and Stuttering: Some Thoughts On Reading Menzies, Onslow, and Packman (1999)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2000, Vol. 9, 87. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0901.87
History: Received March 8, 1999 , Accepted September 29, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2000, Vol. 9, 87. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0901.87
History: Received March 8, 1999; Accepted September 29, 1999
In a recent issue of AJSLP, Menzies, Onslow, and Packman (1999)  contend that there is a clear and significant relationship between stuttering and anxiety despite certain negative research findings. My purpose in this letter is not to argue otherwise. Indeed, it would be difficult for any clinician who has observed the conditions under which people stutter to do so. What I would like to point out instead is that whether stuttering is invariably associated with anxiety, in every instance and for every person, is a question that goes to the heart of our understanding of the nature of the stuttering block.
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