Comprehension Monitoring: A Developmental Effect? This study investigated whether children’s comprehension monitoring skills follow a developmental effect as postulated by Dollaghan and Kaston (1986) in their treatment sequence for developing comprehension monitoring skills. Participants were 36 children grouped by age into 3-, 6-, and 9-year-olds who were developing normally. Each child was administered the Test ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2000
Comprehension Monitoring: A Developmental Effect?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Danielle B. (Schultz) Walters
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Robin S. Chapman
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Contact author: Danielle B. Walters, MS, 612 Old Indian Mound Trail, Sun Prairie, WI 53590.
    Contact author: Danielle B. Walters, MS, 612 Old Indian Mound Trail, Sun Prairie, WI 53590. ×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2000
Comprehension Monitoring: A Developmental Effect?
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2000, Vol. 9, 48-54. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0901.48
History: Received June 1, 1999 , Accepted December 21, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2000, Vol. 9, 48-54. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0901.48
History: Received June 1, 1999; Accepted December 21, 1999

This study investigated whether children’s comprehension monitoring skills follow a developmental effect as postulated by Dollaghan and Kaston (1986) in their treatment sequence for developing comprehension monitoring skills. Participants were 36 children grouped by age into 3-, 6-, and 9-year-olds who were developing normally. Each child was administered the Test of Auditory Comprehension of Language–Revised (TACL-R; Carrow-Woolfolk, 1985). Participants were then required to follow audio-recorded instructions to manipulate objects in front of them. The instructions were either adequate, distorted in acoustic signal, had inadequate content, or were excessively lengthy and complex. Verbal reactions to the three types of inadequate messages, and the proportion of reactions requesting clarification, were each analyzed in two-way ANOVAs, age group by message type. Children verbally reacted to inadequate content of directions more frequently than distorted or lengthy/complex messages, both in verbal comment and in the proportion of clarification requests. Age interacted with item type, but no evidence for a developmental effect was found. Nor did sentence comprehension (TACL-R) correlate with verbally expressed comprehension monitoring. These results suggest that children may be monitoring possible actions in the world rather than monitoring their own understanding of messages.

Author Note
The master’s thesis on which this article is based would not have been possible without the support received from others. The committee members, Dolores (Dee) Kluppel Vetter and Susan Ellis Weismer, deserve thanks for providing thoughtful advice in the planning and execution of this project. Also, thanks to Michelle Quinn for helping with the planning of the project at the meetings.
Thanks to the Department of Communicative Disorders at the University of Wisconsin–Madison for the grant money that helped support the expenses of the project. Sincere gratitude is also extended to the parents, teachers, and children who graciously allowed us to enter their lives to collect the needed data.
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