Readability of Educational Materials for Clients With Cleft Lip/Palate and Their Families Educational materials for clients with cleft lip/palate and their families and materials for the general public produced by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association were analyzed for readability. The SMOG Grading Formula, a simple, fast procedure for predicting grade-level difficulty of written material, and the Fry index of readability, a more lengthy ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   February 01, 2000
Readability of Educational Materials for Clients With Cleft Lip/Palate and Their Families
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alice Kahn
    Miami University, Oxford, OH
  • Mary Pannbacker
    Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA
  • Contact author: Alice Kahn, PhD, Department of Communication, 2 Bachelor Hall, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056.
    Contact author: Alice Kahn, PhD, Department of Communication, 2 Bachelor Hall, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: KAHNA@muohio.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   February 01, 2000
Readability of Educational Materials for Clients With Cleft Lip/Palate and Their Families
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2000, Vol. 9, 3-9. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0901.03
History: Received May 10, 1999 , Accepted December 17, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2000, Vol. 9, 3-9. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0901.03
History: Received May 10, 1999; Accepted December 17, 1999

Educational materials for clients with cleft lip/palate and their families and materials for the general public produced by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association were analyzed for readability. The SMOG Grading Formula, a simple, fast procedure for predicting grade-level difficulty of written material, and the Fry index of readability, a more lengthy measure of readability, were used to analyze 30 publications. Reading levels were computed, and results ranged from elementary to college level. The majority of materials were written at or above the high school readability level. Results suggest a need for revision of current materials to lower reading levels. Writers should consider the appropriateness of reading level for readers when preparing educational materials.

Author’s Note
We would like to acknowledge the assistance of Charles Diggs of the ASHA National Office in providing publication dates for ASHA materials.
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