A Comparison of Service Delivery Models: Effects on Curricular Vocabulary Skills in the School Setting The present study evaluated the effectiveness of three service delivery models in the elementary school setting. Differences were investigated between (a) a collaborative approach, (b) a classroom-based intervention model with the speech-language pathologist (SLP) and classroom teachers working independently, and (c) a traditional pull-out model for children in kindergarten through ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2000
A Comparison of Service Delivery Models: Effects on Curricular Vocabulary Skills in the School Setting
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca N. Throneburg
    Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
  • Lynn K. Calvert
    Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
  • Jennifer J. Sturm
    Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
  • Alexis A. Paramboukas
    Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
  • Pamela J. Paul
    Charleston Community School District #1, Charleston, IL
  • Contact author: Rebecca Throneburg, PhD, Eastern Illinois University, Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences, 600 Lincoln Ave., Charleston, IL 61920.
    Contact author: Rebecca Throneburg, PhD, Eastern Illinois University, Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences, 600 Lincoln Ave., Charleston, IL 61920.×
  • Corresponding author: Email: cfrxt@eiu.edu
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2000
A Comparison of Service Delivery Models: Effects on Curricular Vocabulary Skills in the School Setting
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2000, Vol. 9, 10-20. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0901.10
History: Received July 6, 1999 , Accepted December 17, 1999
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2000, Vol. 9, 10-20. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0901.10
History: Received July 6, 1999; Accepted December 17, 1999

The present study evaluated the effectiveness of three service delivery models in the elementary school setting. Differences were investigated between (a) a collaborative approach, (b) a classroom-based intervention model with the speech-language pathologist (SLP) and classroom teachers working independently, and (c) a traditional pull-out model for children in kindergarten through third grade who qualified for speech or language services. The same curricular vocabulary targets and materials were used in all conditions. This study also examined the vocabulary skills of regular education children who participated in the collaborative approach, the independent classroom-based model, or received instruction from only classroom teachers, without the SLP’s involvement. Results indicated the collaborative model was more effective for teaching curricular vocabulary to students who qualified for speech or language services than a classroom-based model (teacher-SLP independent) or a traditional pull-out model. The findings for students who were not enrolled in speech or language services indicated the collaborative and classroom-based models increased vocabulary skills to a significantly greater degree than receiving only regular instruction from the classroom teacher. The results are congruent with the theoretical advantages of the collaborative model reported in the literature and support the use of integrated service delivery models for intervention in the school setting.

Author Note
The authors wish to thank the principals at the two schools that participated in the present study, Mr. David Carey and Mr. Terry Diss, as well as the 12 classroom teachers whose cooperation and flexibility were instrumental by agreeing to the design of the present study, allowing interruptions for pre- and posttesting, and obtaining parent permission slips. This research was part of authors Sturm and Paramboukas’s master’s theses. Author Pam Paul was the school SLP who found the time to implement this elaborate project in the midst of all of her regular commitments. Her dedication to evaluating new methods to determine which best serve the students in her caseload is commendable. We also wish to extend our appreciation to the editorial consultants, Kevin Cole and Carla Johnson, who provided helpful suggestions regarding an earlier version of this manuscript. Portions of this paper were presented in poster sessions at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, November 1998, in San Antonio, TX.
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